Posted tagged ‘B. J. Myrick’

November 24, 2015

MY FAVORITE SCENE

angel of mercy book cover final gak

Back in 2003, I had just finished my new mystery when the blue screen of death flashed across the monitor; that was the day my computer crashed. My daughter, a computer technician, said to send it to her in Salt Lake, Utah, saying she would recover my files from the hard drive and put them on  a new computer. The only problem was the postman delivered the computer to the wrong house. My manuscript was lost forever.

I moped around for three months before a light bulb came on . . . if my critique partners were as dilatory as I about deleting my sent files, maybe they didn’t either. Between the four critique members, I recovered all the chapters but two. My novel was resurrected from the dead. It was tedious to retype and revise the novel, but I was determined to save my story.

Today, I’m sharing my favorite scene with you, my readers.

THE SCENE

Emma put the tray on the coffee table, handed Suzy a plate filled with chips, the slap sandwich, and wedges of fresh green pepper. “Can you reach your coffee if I set it on the table?” Emma asked as she put the cup down.

Suzy nodded, crunching the food with obvious delight.

Emma settled on the couch and bit into the sandwich.

Suzy fixed her eyes on the ceiling with a faraway look. “Have you ever wondered what it would be like to kill someone? To actually murder and feel the burst of emotion first hand, to capture the sensation in your writing?” She stopped and giggled. “Of course, it would need to be someone weak and unable to fight back. I’m at a disadvantage in this wheelchair. Still, other ways are just as effective, like rat poison, for instance. It would be easy to slip something like that into a drink. Get what I mean?” She arched her brows, leaning a bit toward Emma, watching her with narrowed eyes.

Emma froze. Her sandwich stuck in her throat. She took a quick gulp of coffee and choked. Her mind exploded with questions. Was Suzy involved? Was that why she came to visit? She had motive, however bizarre, by acting out murders to use as research in her writing. But taking realism to a new level by murdering someone for the sake of a novel was unthinkable. Yet . . . .

Suzy’s voice cut through her thoughts. “Are you all right, Emma? You look a little pale. Did I upset you?” She crammed a mouthful of food in her mouth and chewed vigorously.

“It’s okay. My sandwich got stuck.” Emma fingered her throat. “I’m fine now, though.”

“Ohhhhhhhhh . . . well, that’s good,” Suzy said, rolling her eyes and nodding. “Sometimes I get so carried away.” She took a small brown notebook from her jacket and opened the pad, reading from a list. “Here’s a good one,” she said, placing a finger on the page. “Smothering an old person is easy and never leaves bruises if you use a pillow. Oh, and this one is great. You can hide medicine from an asthmatic or someone with a heart condition. Look.” She turned the book so Emma could see and flipped through the pages. “These notes are full of fool-proof ways to murder without getting caught.” She paused. “I’ve been researching this crap forever.” She finished the last of her sandwich, gulped the rest of her coffee down, and leaned back with a satisfied smile.

Emma swallowed hard. “Sounds like you’re thinking of killing someone. Am I having lunch with a killer?”

Suzy’s laughter peeled through the room. “Tell me you haven’t thought about the realism that murdering someone would add to your work. Admit it!” She leaned forward, reflections glancing off her glasses as her eyes appeared to measure Emma’s reaction.

Emma’s heart beat double time, and she edged forward on her seat. Suzy’s bizarre visit took on new meaning. For the first time she wondered how Suzy had known which apartment was hers unless she’d been shadowing her. Now, Emma was trapped with a crazy, giggling writer who wanted to talk about different ways to commit murder. Was the woman insane?

 

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Read more about B. J. Myrick and her books at amazon.com.

Read more on her book page.

 

 

 

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Legacies From The Past

September 27, 2013

A WORD FROM B. J. MYRICK

Have you ever wondered where a writer gets the idea for a particular book and what is involved in the creation of the story that looks so enticing in the book’s description? The idea for my novel was inspired by Mother’s stories about homesteading in No Man’s Land and my great-grandmother’s recipes for herbal cures—she was a medicine woman.

Within the tattered pages of the old Dr. Chase book, published in the 1800’s, were my great-grandmother’s recipes for herbal cures written on blank pages at the end of chapters. They contained weird ingredients such as sugar of lead, chloroform, sarsaparilla, sulphuric ether and acid, iodide of potash, stillingia, poke root, and morphine, to name just a few. Her cures covered diphtheria, blood purifier and liver regulator, piles, worms, and a host of other ailments. With her concoctions, she healed ill and dying patients who had been given up to die by the doctors. Unfortunately, she never passed down the tradition of healing with herbs.

As I considered how I could use the herbal healing in a novel, I remembered all those family stories my mother told me about homesteading in No Man’s Land. As a child, I used to beg her to retell the stories, and she would laugh and say, “Oh, you don’t want to hear that again.” But she always recounted those fascinating tales of digging the dugout, confronting outlaws, digging the well, fighting prairie fires set by the cattlemen to drive out settlers who were a  threat to open range. I never tired of hearing about those frightening experiences of what it was like to homestead in that wild and untamed territory.

The story, Nelly of No Man’s Land takes place in Oklahoma over a two-year period. A pioneer family homesteads in The Strip where they struggle to survive in a lawless territory. Nelly Duncan is a dying woman who battles to regain her health while struggling to resolve the personal pain of her husband’s alcohol addiction and infidelity. Through the help of a medicine man, she regains her health there. Then the past returns to haunt her: the handsome peddler she turned to for comfort during her husband’s unfaithfulness and who fathered a child her husband thinks is his own, reappears in her life.

Take a step back in time and travel with me through the pages of Nelly of No Man’s Land as I share the journey with you. The historical novel is available at amazon.com in both eBook and paperback.

VIEW THE BOOK TRAILER

Read more about B. J. Myrick and her books at amazon.com.

Thanks to vintagefeedsacks for their images.

DARK SIDE DRAMA

August 2, 2013

gold frame template reader theater copy

Welcome to Keyhole Conversations new venture into Readers Little Theater. 

Author  B. J. Myrick and co-author Hazel Hart have allowed their characters to speak from the pages of their book, DARK SIDE OF THE RAINBOW.  Jenny Marsh and her sister, Darlene, share the spotlight in this scene from the tale, “Lady in the Dark.” Bonnie Myrick portrays Jenny who has been attacked by a mutant spider, while Arlene Graber stars as the beautiful and personable sister, Darlene.

Jenny is recovering from her hospital stay with Darlene after being attacked by a giant spider. Darlene is ready for Jenny to go home.

The lights are going down now, the curtain is parting. It’s time to settle into a comfortable chair, watch the show, and be grateful it wasn’t you the mutant spider wanted for lunch.

We want to  thank Arlene Graber for participating in today’s Readers Little Theater. Be sure to check out her amazon author page and her website.

A CHAT WITH BONNIE MYRICK  bonnie68

Every story starts with an idea, but there is more thought put into even a short story than you might imagine.

First of all, I had to familiarize myself with the habits of arachnids before I could write “Lady in the Dark.” Then I considered: was it possible for mutant spiders to exist? What if government experiments could combine stem cells with transgenic research to trap a human brain inside a spider, making it possible for a man’s brain to control and use a giant spider as a weapon of war?  How would the mating urge affect the story if the spider escaped? Research had to be conducted on spider sex to discover how it might be possible for an arachnid to mate with a human.

For a story to succeed, a reader must be able to suspend disbelief, which is made possible if an author lays a thorough groundwork of  research. With this in mind, would you suspend belief and take a walk with me on the dark side?

tech hotties copyABOUT THE AUTHORS

Authors, Bonnie Myrick Eaton and Hazel Hart have partnered up to produce two short story collections of dark fiction, DARK SIDE OF THE RAINBOW and EDGE OF NOWHERE.  Both authors are members of the Kansas Writers Association, and both  have won numerous awards for their fiction.

Hazel teaches English online for Butler County Community College. She has published four novels and co-authored two books with Bonnie Myrick, She also has published one collection of short stories, THE NANCY NOLAN SHOW.

Bonnie Myrick has published two novels, a historical and a paranormal suspense and written two books of dark fiction with Hazel Hart. Her current mystery, ASSISTED DYING, is schedule for publication in 2013.

Subscribe to Keyhole Conversations while you’re here!

Thanks to vintagefeedsacks for the use of their images.

Half-Pint and The Outlaws

December 8, 2012
Book cover design completed by Gordon Kessler.
Check out his e-pub services.

Back Cover2 copy

READ AN EXCERPT FROM THE NOVEL

Nelly has taken in a neighbor’s twins after their parents were victims of a grudge-murder by outlaws. Now the killers have come for the children. Nelly is terrified but has vowed the outlaws will have to take the children over her dead body. The following is the rest of the scene.

 ____________

“How you gonna stop us, half-pint?” the leader asked with a wide grin. He wore a black shirt with a red handkerchief tied around his neck. Pushing the brim of his hat back, he eyed her up and down. “What a pretty package to have such a big mouth. Ain’t she got a big mouth?” He turned to grin at his men.

Big mouth!” one said.

The whiskered man beside the leader had hard eyes and a cruel mouth that twitched at the corner. “Bring ’em out, lady, or we’re gonna go in an’ get ’em. With or without your say.” He leaned on his pommel and spat tobacco juice to one side.

“Over my dead body,” she said and lifted her chin higher. Her blood hammered through her veins. They would kill her. Oh sweet Jesus. Give me courage.

The leader took out his gun and cocked it. “Happy to oblige.” He pointed the gun at her feet. “Let’s see if you dance as good as you sass. You good at dancing, lady?”

She trembled, wanting to turn and run, but her feet wouldn’t obey. Their eyes locked. She stared at him defiantly.

He squinted, lifting his brow.

Nelly stood her ground. It didn’t seem to matter. She couldn’t move her feet anyway. “Big man, aren’t you?” she sneered, her mouth twisting. “It’s easy to pick on a defenseless woman half your size, isn’t it? Oh, and don’t forget the little ones that’s never done a thing to you.”

The man with the black hat roared boisterously. “C’mon men, let’s show her how t’ dance.”

His three cohorts drew their guns. Shots hit the ground—whizzing, zinging, ricocheting around her feet—kicking up dirt and debris.

Nelly froze, terrified.

Don’t show fear, Nelly, don’t show fear!

Dust stung her nostrils, and she felt the beginning of a sneeze develop. Then it happened. She sneezed, several times, and covered her nose with her hand. The shooting stopped.

“Well by god, we didn’t make her dance, but we sure as hell made her sneeze,” the man with the red bandana said. He busted into laughter, and the others joined in.

The leader spurred his horse, turned, and with the others following, he called back over his shoulder, “By god, you’re one damned plucky lady. You earned those kids.”

They galloped off, the thunder of horses hooves resounding across the land.

Gone! They were gone!

She collapsed on the ground, trembling, heard the bolt slide back, then Wray was at her side, helping her up. “I was afraid I’d hit you, Mom. I couldn’t shoot with you in the way.” Tears streamed down his face. “I didn’t know what to do. I’m sorry.”

You can find the e-book here.

Read more about B. J. Myrick and her books at amazon.com.
Thanks to vintagefeedsacks for their images

GRANDMAMA TELLS ALL!

November 30, 2012

In an interview, Grandmama, a character in B.J Myrick’s “Nelly of No Man’s Land,” gives her opinions on Nelly’s marriage and the author’s choices. “Nelly of No Man’s Land” will be available on Amazon Kindle December 1, 2012.

FIRESIDE CHAT WITH B. J. MYRICK

As I watched Grandmama on the vlog, I had to smile. It isn’t often I get to control someone else’s life, since I’ve never been able to control my own. Life is a game of chance. You only think you’re in control, but you aren’t. Maybe that’s why I became a writer. I like to move my characters around like a Kansas tornado, just to see how they land on their feet, see what they’re made of.

Do you think Grandmama was even aware I was directing her life as well as her granddaughter’s? As Grandmama stated, I could have given her granddaughter that devilishly handsome and newly-rich man, and it almost happened, but then I snatched that ripe, red apple from her before she took that second bite.

In the end, though, it all came out as I planned. Sometimes that apple has a worm in it or a core that’s rotten, but you don’t see it until you take that first bite. After all, isn’t life about losing everything you love and accepting what crumbs are left? Or is it about learning to appreciate how good the crumbs taste when all is said and done?

VIEW THE BOOK TRAILER

Read more about B. J. Myrick and her books at amazon.com.

Don’t miss Keyhole Conversation’s character interviews. Subscribe 
Thanks to vintagefeedsacks for their images.

A PEEK INTO THE PAST: Legacies From My Mother

November 17, 2012

A WORD FROM B. J. MYRICK

Have you ever wondered where a writer gets the idea for a particular book and what is involved in the creation of the story that looks so enticing in the book’s description? In a series of blog posts this month, I will touch on what is involved in creating a novel while trying to remain faithful to history, move into a character interview, and end with a reading from the novel. I’ll start with the idea for the novel, which was inspired by both my mother’s stories about homesteading in No Man’s Land and my great-grandmother’s recipes for herbal cures—she was a medicine woman.

Within the tattered pages of the old Dr. Chase’s book, published sometime in the 1800s, were my great-grandmother’s handwritten recipes for medicines written on the blank pages at the end of chapters. They contained weird ingredients such as sugar of lead, chloroform, sarsaparilla, sulphuric ether and acid, iodide of potash, stillingia, poke root, morphine, to name just a few. Her cures covered diphtheria, blood purifier and liver regulator, piles, worms, and a host of other ailments. With her concoctions, she healed ill and dying patients who had been given up to die by the doctors. Unfortunately, she never passed down the tradition of healing with herbs.

As I considered how I could use the herbal healing in a novel, what story I could tell, I remembered all those family stories my mother told me about homesteading in No Man’s Land. As a child, I used to beg her to retell the stories, and she would laugh and say, “Oh, you don’t want to hear that again.” But she always recounted those fascinating tales of digging the dugout, confronting outlaws, and surviving the war between the cattlemen and the settlers. I never tired of hearing about those frightening experiences of what it was like to homestead in that wild and untamed territory.

The story, Nelly of No Man’s Land takes place in Oklahoma over a two-year period. A pioneer family homesteads in The Strip where they struggle to survive in a lawless territory. Nelly Duncan is a dying woman who battles to regain her health while struggling to resolve the personal pain of her husband’s alcohol addiction and infidelity. Through the help of a medicine man, she regains her health there. Then the past returns to haunt her: the handsome peddler she turned to for comfort during her husband’s unfaithfulness and who fathered a child her husband thinks is his own, reappears in her life.

Take a step back in time and travel with me through the pages of Nelly of No Man’s Land as I share the journey with you. The historical novel is scheduled for publication around the first week of December, just in time for Christmas.

VIEW THE BOOK TRAILER

And read more about B. J. Myrick and her books at amazon.com.

Don’t miss Keyhole Conversation’s new character interviews. Subscribe 
Thanks to vintagefeedsacks for their images.

NO MAN’S LAND

November 8, 2012

Coming soon:   In 1890, a pioneer family homesteads in Oklahoma’s No Man’s Land where they  struggle to survive in a lawless territory.

Storyline: When the doctor gives NELLY DUNCAN up to die, her husband, WILL DUNCAN, moves the family to Oklahoma’s No Man’s Land in the hopes Nelly can regain her health. The territory—wild and dangerous–is filled with outlaws and disgruntled cattlemen who will kill or burn the settlers out to keep free range. Wolves and coyotes threaten their stock. To complicate matters, Nelly’s personal battle to regain her health is hindered by Will’s addiction to alcohol and infidelity. Take a look!

About the Author

Bonnie Myrick was born in 1932 in Atlanta, Kansas, to Scotch, Irish, and English parents. Her career as Art Educator spanned twenty-three years. Her first novel, “Out of Control,” is a paranormal suspense, and she partnered up with Hazel Hart to produce two short story collections of dark fiction, “Edge of Nowhere” and “Dark Side of the Rainbow.” Her historical novel, “Nelly of No Man’s Land” is scheduled for release in December. She is currently working on “Assisted Living,” a mystery. She has one daughter and lives in the Midwest.

Don’t miss Keyhole Conversation’s new character interviews. Subscribe 

Thanks to vintagefeedsacks for their images.