Posted tagged ‘readings by authors’

FIDDLING WITH BONES

February 17, 2012

In this Keyhole Conversations video, Conrad Jestmore reads a scene from his mystery novel, River of Murder, in which PI Jimmy ‘OReilly and university professor and bone specialist Laura Bascome find a missing finger bone in a most unusual place. Read below for more secrets on River of Murder and some facts about bones. His book can be found here.

SECRETS OF THE BONES

BONE-IFIED  FACTS

“Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones, dem bones gonna walk around.”

Traditional spiritual song , based on Ezekiel, who prophesied in the Valley of Dry Bones, that the bones would come alive.

Bones do come alive, because they

  • survive the process of decay
  • provide living evidence
  • can verify age, sex, ancestry, stature, weight
  • can show manner of death: homicide, suicide, accidental, natural, unknown
  • can show cause: injury, disease, combination
  • can verify time of death

There are 206 bones in the adult human body.

There are 27 bones in the human hand.

A phalanx is a military formation. It is also a finger bone.

A proximal phalanx has multiple usages. Not all of them human. Not all of them alive.

Find the bones. Find the killer.

SPIDERS AND THRUMMING AND STRANGE BODY CHANGES, OH MY!

February 11, 2012

Starting today, KEYHOLE CONVERSATIONS will feature a new six-week series on authors reading a favorite scene from their book.

Our first award-winning writer,  Hazel Hart, is an author of many talents who has  five published books to her credit. She has selected a scene from Dark Side of the Rainbow, a chilling collection of  short stories she co-authored with B. J. Myrick.

The story, Lady in the Dark, is about a woman  who searches for answers to the strange changes within her body after an attack by a gigantic five-foot spider and uncovers covert government research gone wrong.

View the video below and step into the world of dark fiction . . . if you dare!

SECRETS ABOUT SPIDERS YOU NEVER WANTED TO KNOW

    1.   Most spiders are very near sighted.

    2.  Spider babies come from eggs. The female lays up   to 300 eggs that are encased in a silk sac. Young spiders can regenerate a lost leg.  Adults can’t.

   3.   Spiders make a new web each day because the old one gets dirty. They roll the old web into a ball and eat it.

4.  A jumping spider can jump up to twenty-five times its own body length.

5.  Mating is dangerous for the male spider, who performs ritualistic dancing to hypnotize the female before fertilization to avoid being eaten by her.

LEARN MORE ABOUT SPIDERS BY VISITING THE WEBSITES OF WIKIPEDIA, TRIBE, AND LANDCARE RESEARCH .

CREDITS:  spider photo iStock #0000017